Economic Develop.

Economic Development

The Armstrong County Department of Economic Development provides staff to the Armstrong County Industrial Development Council (IDC), a 501(c)(3) non-profit economic development corporation.  By providing tools such as financing, site selection, workforce development assistance and more, the IDC's goals are to improve Armstrong County’s business environment through retention and expansion of existing businesses and attraction of new investment. Click here for more Information.

Conservation Dist.

Conservation District

The Armstrong Conservation District works to restore degraded watersheds, promote sustainable farms, healthy forests, and growing vibrant and sustainable communities. The District will work with many private and public partners for the betterment of our natural resources and the citizens of Armstrong County. The District provides technical, administrative, and financial support through many programs such as the dirt, gravel, low volume roads program; the agricultural lands preservation program; the erosion and sediment pollution control program; the watershed protection and restoration program; and many other outreach efforts of the District

Jail

Jail

The Armstrong County Jail, which opened in August of 2003, has a capacity of 158 inmates. The facility grants a safe environment to the Armstrong County community by providing the care and control of the jail's residents.

Belmont

Belmont Complex

For over 50 years, the Belmont Complex has been a recreational facility that draws over 40,000 residents and visitors alike to the arena, pool and banquet facilities yearly.

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Public Election Notices

 

Official Notice of Election for Military and Overseas Voters
County of Armstrong

2021 Municipal Primary (May 18, 2021)

This is an official notice of a Primary election to be conducted on 5/18/2021 in Armstrong County.  You may register to vote and request an official absentee ballot by using the Federal Postcard Application (FPCA), available at www.votespa.com or www.fvap.gov.  You may apply for an absentee ballot by submitting your FPCA by fax to ( 724 ) 548 - 3714, or by email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

You may request an absentee ballot from this office at any time prior to a primary or election.  However, if time does not permit you to receive and return an official absentee ballot, you are also entitled to vote using the Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot (FWAB).  Military electors may also use the FWAB to register to vote and vote simultaneously.  

You may use the FWAB to vote for all state and local offices, and ballot initiatives.

To vote, refer to page 3 of the FWAB. 

To vote for state and local offices or for ballot initiatives, write the names of candidates or ballot initiatives in the Addendum section of the FWAB.  Under the Office/Ballot Initiative heading, enter the office the candidate is running for or the title of the Ballot Initiative (referendum).   Under the Candidate Name, Party Affiliation or Initiative Vote heading, list the name of the candidate you wish to vote for, or if you are voting on a Referendum question write “yes” or “no.”

Please scroll down to see Democratic, Republican, and Non-Partisan ballots.

 


DEMOCRATIC BALLOT

JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT -- Vote for One -- All Precincts within Armstrong County

JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT -- Vote for One -- All Precincts within Armstrong County

JUDGE OF THE COMMONWEALTH COURT -- Vote for Two -- All Precincts within Armstrong County

CORONER -- Vote for One -- All Precincts within Armstrong County

DISTRICT ATTORNEY -- Vote for One -- All Precincts within Armstrong County

SHERIFF  -- Vote for One -- All Precincts within Armstrong County

MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT JUDGE (33-3-03) – Vote for one

SCHOOL DIRECTOR

MAYOR

COUNCIL (City and Borough)

TOWNSHIP SUPERVISOR

AUDITOR (Borough and Township)

JUDGE OF ELECTIONS

INSPECTOR OF ELECTIONS

CONSTABLE

For a complete listing of candidates please go to
LIST OF CANDIDATES

 

Proposed constitutional amendment – ARTICLE III, SECTION 9

RELATING TO TERMINATION OR EXTENSION OF DISASTER EMERGENCY DECLARATIONS

Ballot Question

Shall the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended to change existing law and increase the power of the General Assembly to unilaterally terminate or extend a disaster emergency declaration—and the powers of Commonwealth agencies to address the disaster regardless of its severity pursuant to that declaration—through passing a concurrent resolution by simple majority, thereby removing the existing check and balance of presenting a resolution to the Governor for approval or disapproval?

Plain English Statement of the Office of Attorney General

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2021-1
RELATING TO THE TERMINATION OR EXTENSION OF DISASTER EMERGENCY DECLARATIONS

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2021-1 proposes to amend Article III, Section 9 of the Pennsylvania Constitution to provide a new exception to traditional legislative procedure by allowing the General Assembly to terminate or extend a disaster emergency declaration or a portion of such declaration without needing the Governor’s approval.

Currently, Article III, Section 9 establishes a general rule that all orders, resolutions or votes requiring approval by both the House of Representatives and Senate must be presented to the Governor for his approval or veto. Resolutions for the adjournment of the General Assembly are exempted from this process. If the order, resolution or vote is approved by the Governor, it becomes law. If the Governor vetoes the resolution, it does not become law unless two-thirds of the House and Senate vote to override the veto. The proposed amendment would create an additional exception to this customary legislative procedure for concurrent resolutions to terminate or extend, in whole or in part, a disaster emergency declaration issued by the Governor.

The proposed amendment will also have the effect of reversing a recent ruling of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court which held the Pennsylvania Constitution prohibited the General Assembly from passing a concurrent resolution to terminate the Governor’s Covid-19 disaster emergency declaration without presenting it to the Governor for his approval. It will change the law to allow the General Assembly to terminate or extend a disaster emergency declaration through a concurrent resolution approved by only a majority of the members of the House and Senate, without having to present the resolution to the Governor for his approval or veto.

The proposed amendment is limited in that it only changes the traditional legislative process for terminating or extending disaster emergency declarations issued by the Governor. The amendment will not alter the current legislative procedure with respect to which orders, resolutions or votes of the General Assembly must be presented to the Governor for his approval on any other subject matter.

Proposed constitutional amendment – ARTICLE iv

DISASTER EMERGENCY DECLARATION AND MANAGEMENT

Ballot Question

Shall the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended to change existing law so that: a disaster emergency declaration will expire automatically after 21 days, regardless of the severity of the emergency, unless the General Assembly takes action to extend the disaster emergency; the Governor may not declare a new disaster emergency to respond to the dangers facing the Commonwealth unless the General Assembly passes a concurrent resolution; the General Assembly enacts new laws for disaster management?

Plain English Statement of the Office of Attorney General

Joint Resolution No. 2021-1
Disaster Emergency Declaration and Management

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2021-1 proposes adding a new section to Article IV of the Pennsylvania Constitution. This amendment incorporates disaster emergency declaration and management powers directly into the Constitution by:

  • Granting the Governor authority to declare a disaster emergency declaration by proclamation or executive order;
  • Requiring each declaration to indicate the nature, location and type of disaster;
  • Granting the General Assembly authority to pass laws providing for the manner in which each disaster shall be managed;
  • Limiting the duration of a Governor’s declaration to 21 days, unless otherwise extended, in whole or in part, by a concurrent resolution of the General Assembly;
  • Preventing the Governor, upon the expiration of a declaration, from issuing a new declaration based upon the same or substantially similar facts, unless the General Assembly passes a concurrent resolution expressly approving a new

Currently, disaster emergency declaration and management powers are delegated by statute to the Governor. The Governor has the sole authority to issue and manage all disaster emergency declarations, which cannot extend beyond 90 days unless renewed by the Governor. The General Assembly may override a Governor’s disaster emergency declaration by concurrent resolution that must be presented to the Governor for his approval or veto.

If approved, the amendment would transfer certain of the Governor’s existing authority to respond to and manage disaster emergencies to the General Assembly. The Governor would retain the authority to issue an initial disaster emergency declaration but the declaration’s permissible length would be reduced from 90 to 21 days. The sole authority to extend a declaration would lie with the General Assembly; presently, this power rests with the Governor. Upon expiration of the initial declaration, the amendment prohibits the Governor from issuing a new declaration based upon the same or substantially similar facts without the approval of the General Assembly. The Governor would no longer have unilateral authority to manage disasters, but would have to do so consistent with the laws passed by the General Assembly.

If approved, the General Assembly would be required to pass new laws establishing the manner in which each type of disaster shall be managed. If added to the Pennsylvania Constitution, the proposed amendment cannot be modified or repealed except by a judicial decision finding all or part of the proposed amendment unconstitutional or by the approval of a subsequent constitutional amendment.

PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT – ARTICLE i

PROHIBITION AGAINST DENIAL OR ABRIDGEMENT
OF EQUALITY OF RIGHTS BECAUSE OF RACE OR ETHNICITY

Ballot Question

Shall the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended by adding a new section providing that equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged because of an individual's race or ethnicity?

Plain English Statement of the Office of Attorney General

Joint Resolution No. 2021-1

Prohibition Against Denial or Abridgment of Equality of Rights Because of Race and Ethnicity

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2021-1, if approved by the electorate, will add a new section to Article I of the Pennsylvania Constitution. This amendment creates a constitutional prohibition against restricting or denying an individual’s equal rights under Pennsylvania law because of race or ethnicity.

Generally, inclusion of this amendment within the Pennsylvania Constitution signifies that freedom from discrimination based on race or ethnicity is an essential principle of liberty and free government. This amendment applies to all Pennsylvania state, county and local governmental entities, and guarantees equality of rights under the law. The amendment, if enacted, will become a part of the Pennsylvania Constitution. As such, its provisions must be applied consistent with the other provisions of the Constitution.

This equal right to be free from racial or ethnic discrimination will exist independent from any such rights under the United States Constitution or corresponding federal law. If the current federal protections proscribing racial or ethnic discrimination are abolished, the prohibition against such discrimination will remain in the Pennsylvania Constitution. The amendment is limited in that it creates a right only under Pennsylvania law.

Once added to the Pennsylvania Constitution, the right to be free from racial or ethnic discrimination under the law cannot be eliminated except by a judicial decision finding the amendment unconstitutional or the approval of a subsequent constitutional amendment. If approved, the General Assembly may pass new laws to implement the amendment, but it may not pass a law inconsistent with it.

 


REPUBLICAN BALLOT

JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT -- Vote for One -- All Precincts within Armstrong County

JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT -- Vote for One -- All Precincts within Armstrong County

JUDGE OF THE COMMONWEALTH COURT -- Vote for Two -- All Precincts within Armstrong County

CORONER -- Vote for One -- All Precincts within Armstrong County

DISTRICT ATTORNEY -- Vote for One -- All Precincts within Armstrong County

SHERIFF  -- Vote for One -- All Precincts within Armstrong County

MAGISTERIAL DISTRICT JUDGE (33-3-03) – Vote for one

SCHOOL DIRECTOR

MAYOR

COUNCIL (City and Borough)

TOWNSHIP SUPERVISOR

AUDITOR (Borough and Township)

JUDGE OF ELECTIONS

INSPECTOR OF ELECTIONS

CONSTABLE

For a complete listing of candidates please go to
LIST OF CANDIDATES

 

Proposed constitutional amendment – ARTICLE III, SECTION 9

RELATING TO TERMINATION OR EXTENSION OF DISASTER EMERGENCY DECLARATIONS

Ballot Question

Shall the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended to change existing law and increase the power of the General Assembly to unilaterally terminate or extend a disaster emergency declaration—and the powers of Commonwealth agencies to address the disaster regardless of its severity pursuant to that declaration—through passing a concurrent resolution by simple majority, thereby removing the existing check and balance of presenting a resolution to the Governor for approval or disapproval?

Plain English Statement of the Office of Attorney General

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2021-1
RELATING TO THE TERMINATION OR EXTENSION OF DISASTER EMERGENCY DECLARATIONS

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2021-1 proposes to amend Article III, Section 9 of the Pennsylvania Constitution to provide a new exception to traditional legislative procedure by allowing the General Assembly to terminate or extend a disaster emergency declaration or a portion of such declaration without needing the Governor’s approval.

Currently, Article III, Section 9 establishes a general rule that all orders, resolutions or votes requiring approval by both the House of Representatives and Senate must be presented to the Governor for his approval or veto. Resolutions for the adjournment of the General Assembly are exempted from this process. If the order, resolution or vote is approved by the Governor, it becomes law. If the Governor vetoes the resolution, it does not become law unless two-thirds of the House and Senate vote to override the veto. The proposed amendment would create an additional exception to this customary legislative procedure for concurrent resolutions to terminate or extend, in whole or in part, a disaster emergency declaration issued by the Governor.

The proposed amendment will also have the effect of reversing a recent ruling of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court which held the Pennsylvania Constitution prohibited the General Assembly from passing a concurrent resolution to terminate the Governor’s Covid-19 disaster emergency declaration without presenting it to the Governor for his approval. It will change the law to allow the General Assembly to terminate or extend a disaster emergency declaration through a concurrent resolution approved by only a majority of the members of the House and Senate, without having to present the resolution to the Governor for his approval or veto.

The proposed amendment is limited in that it only changes the traditional legislative process for terminating or extending disaster emergency declarations issued by the Governor. The amendment will not alter the current legislative procedure with respect to which orders, resolutions or votes of the General Assembly must be presented to the Governor for his approval on any other subject matter.

Proposed constitutional amendment – ARTICLE iv

DISASTER EMERGENCY DECLARATION AND MANAGEMENT

Ballot Question

Shall the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended to change existing law so that: a disaster emergency declaration will expire automatically after 21 days, regardless of the severity of the emergency, unless the General Assembly takes action to extend the disaster emergency; the Governor may not declare a new disaster emergency to respond to the dangers facing the Commonwealth unless the General Assembly passes a concurrent resolution; the General Assembly enacts new laws for disaster management?

Plain English Statement of the Office of Attorney General

Joint Resolution No. 2021-1
Disaster Emergency Declaration and Management

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2021-1 proposes adding a new section to Article IV of the Pennsylvania Constitution. This amendment incorporates disaster emergency declaration and management powers directly into the Constitution by:

  • Granting the Governor authority to declare a disaster emergency declaration by proclamation or executive order;
  • Requiring each declaration to indicate the nature, location and type of disaster;
  • Granting the General Assembly authority to pass laws providing for the manner in which each disaster shall be managed;
  • Limiting the duration of a Governor’s declaration to 21 days, unless otherwise extended, in whole or in part, by a concurrent resolution of the General Assembly;
  • Preventing the Governor, upon the expiration of a declaration, from issuing a new declaration based upon the same or substantially similar facts, unless the General Assembly passes a concurrent resolution expressly approving a new

Currently, disaster emergency declaration and management powers are delegated by statute to the Governor. The Governor has the sole authority to issue and manage all disaster emergency declarations, which cannot extend beyond 90 days unless renewed by the Governor. The General Assembly may override a Governor’s disaster emergency declaration by concurrent resolution that must be presented to the Governor for his approval or veto.

If approved, the amendment would transfer certain of the Governor’s existing authority to respond to and manage disaster emergencies to the General Assembly. The Governor would retain the authority to issue an initial disaster emergency declaration but the declaration’s permissible length would be reduced from 90 to 21 days. The sole authority to extend a declaration would lie with the General Assembly; presently, this power rests with the Governor. Upon expiration of the initial declaration, the amendment prohibits the Governor from issuing a new declaration based upon the same or substantially similar facts without the approval of the General Assembly. The Governor would no longer have unilateral authority to manage disasters, but would have to do so consistent with the laws passed by the General Assembly.

If approved, the General Assembly would be required to pass new laws establishing the manner in which each type of disaster shall be managed. If added to the Pennsylvania Constitution, the proposed amendment cannot be modified or repealed except by a judicial decision finding all or part of the proposed amendment unconstitutional or by the approval of a subsequent constitutional amendment.

PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT – ARTICLE i

PROHIBITION AGAINST DENIAL OR ABRIDGEMENT
OF EQUALITY OF RIGHTS BECAUSE OF RACE OR ETHNICITY

Ballot Question

Shall the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended by adding a new section providing that equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged because of an individual's race or ethnicity?

Plain English Statement of the Office of Attorney General

Joint Resolution No. 2021-1

Prohibition Against Denial or Abridgment of Equality of Rights Because of Race and Ethnicity

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2021-1, if approved by the electorate, will add a new section to Article I of the Pennsylvania Constitution. This amendment creates a constitutional prohibition against restricting or denying an individual’s equal rights under Pennsylvania law because of race or ethnicity.

Generally, inclusion of this amendment within the Pennsylvania Constitution signifies that freedom from discrimination based on race or ethnicity is an essential principle of liberty and free government. This amendment applies to all Pennsylvania state, county and local governmental entities, and guarantees equality of rights under the law. The amendment, if enacted, will become a part of the Pennsylvania Constitution. As such, its provisions must be applied consistent with the other provisions of the Constitution.

This equal right to be free from racial or ethnic discrimination will exist independent from any such rights under the United States Constitution or corresponding federal law. If the current federal protections proscribing racial or ethnic discrimination are abolished, the prohibition against such discrimination will remain in the Pennsylvania Constitution. The amendment is limited in that it creates a right only under Pennsylvania law.

Once added to the Pennsylvania Constitution, the right to be free from racial or ethnic discrimination under the law cannot be eliminated except by a judicial decision finding the amendment unconstitutional or the approval of a subsequent constitutional amendment. If approved, the General Assembly may pass new laws to implement the amendment, but it may not pass a law inconsistent with it.

 


NON-PARTISAN BALLOT

Proposed constitutional amendment – ARTICLE III, SECTION 9

RELATING TO TERMINATION OR EXTENSION OF DISASTER EMERGENCY DECLARATIONS

Ballot Question

Shall the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended to change existing law and increase the power of the General Assembly to unilaterally terminate or extend a disaster emergency declaration—and the powers of Commonwealth agencies to address the disaster regardless of its severity pursuant to that declaration—through passing a concurrent resolution by simple majority, thereby removing the existing check and balance of presenting a resolution to the Governor for approval or disapproval?

Plain English Statement of the Office of Attorney General

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2021-1
RELATING TO THE TERMINATION OR EXTENSION OF DISASTER EMERGENCY DECLARATIONS

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2021-1 proposes to amend Article III, Section 9 of the Pennsylvania Constitution to provide a new exception to traditional legislative procedure by allowing the General Assembly to terminate or extend a disaster emergency declaration or a portion of such declaration without needing the Governor’s approval.

Currently, Article III, Section 9 establishes a general rule that all orders, resolutions or votes requiring approval by both the House of Representatives and Senate must be presented to the Governor for his approval or veto. Resolutions for the adjournment of the General Assembly are exempted from this process. If the order, resolution or vote is approved by the Governor, it becomes law. If the Governor vetoes the resolution, it does not become law unless two-thirds of the House and Senate vote to override the veto. The proposed amendment would create an additional exception to this customary legislative procedure for concurrent resolutions to terminate or extend, in whole or in part, a disaster emergency declaration issued by the Governor.

The proposed amendment will also have the effect of reversing a recent ruling of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court which held the Pennsylvania Constitution prohibited the General Assembly from passing a concurrent resolution to terminate the Governor’s Covid-19 disaster emergency declaration without presenting it to the Governor for his approval. It will change the law to allow the General Assembly to terminate or extend a disaster emergency declaration through a concurrent resolution approved by only a majority of the members of the House and Senate, without having to present the resolution to the Governor for his approval or veto.

The proposed amendment is limited in that it only changes the traditional legislative process for terminating or extending disaster emergency declarations issued by the Governor. The amendment will not alter the current legislative procedure with respect to which orders, resolutions or votes of the General Assembly must be presented to the Governor for his approval on any other subject matter.

Proposed constitutional amendment – ARTICLE iv

DISASTER EMERGENCY DECLARATION AND MANAGEMENT

Ballot Question

Shall the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended to change existing law so that: a disaster emergency declaration will expire automatically after 21 days, regardless of the severity of the emergency, unless the General Assembly takes action to extend the disaster emergency; the Governor may not declare a new disaster emergency to respond to the dangers facing the Commonwealth unless the General Assembly passes a concurrent resolution; the General Assembly enacts new laws for disaster management?

Plain English Statement of the Office of Attorney General

Joint Resolution No. 2021-1
Disaster Emergency Declaration and Management

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2021-1 proposes adding a new section to Article IV of the Pennsylvania Constitution. This amendment incorporates disaster emergency declaration and management powers directly into the Constitution by:

  • Granting the Governor authority to declare a disaster emergency declaration by proclamation or executive order;
  • Requiring each declaration to indicate the nature, location and type of disaster;
  • Granting the General Assembly authority to pass laws providing for the manner in which each disaster shall be managed;
  • Limiting the duration of a Governor’s declaration to 21 days, unless otherwise extended, in whole or in part, by a concurrent resolution of the General Assembly;
  • Preventing the Governor, upon the expiration of a declaration, from issuing a new declaration based upon the same or substantially similar facts, unless the General Assembly passes a concurrent resolution expressly approving a new

Currently, disaster emergency declaration and management powers are delegated by statute to the Governor. The Governor has the sole authority to issue and manage all disaster emergency declarations, which cannot extend beyond 90 days unless renewed by the Governor. The General Assembly may override a Governor’s disaster emergency declaration by concurrent resolution that must be presented to the Governor for his approval or veto.

If approved, the amendment would transfer certain of the Governor’s existing authority to respond to and manage disaster emergencies to the General Assembly. The Governor would retain the authority to issue an initial disaster emergency declaration but the declaration’s permissible length would be reduced from 90 to 21 days. The sole authority to extend a declaration would lie with the General Assembly; presently, this power rests with the Governor. Upon expiration of the initial declaration, the amendment prohibits the Governor from issuing a new declaration based upon the same or substantially similar facts without the approval of the General Assembly. The Governor would no longer have unilateral authority to manage disasters, but would have to do so consistent with the laws passed by the General Assembly.

If approved, the General Assembly would be required to pass new laws establishing the manner in which each type of disaster shall be managed. If added to the Pennsylvania Constitution, the proposed amendment cannot be modified or repealed except by a judicial decision finding all or part of the proposed amendment unconstitutional or by the approval of a subsequent constitutional amendment.

PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT – ARTICLE i

PROHIBITION AGAINST DENIAL OR ABRIDGEMENT
OF EQUALITY OF RIGHTS BECAUSE OF RACE OR ETHNICITY

Ballot Question

Shall the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended by adding a new section providing that equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged because of an individual's race or ethnicity?

Plain English Statement of the Office of Attorney General

Joint Resolution No. 2021-1

Prohibition Against Denial or Abridgment of Equality of Rights Because of Race and Ethnicity

JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 2021-1, if approved by the electorate, will add a new section to Article I of the Pennsylvania Constitution. This amendment creates a constitutional prohibition against restricting or denying an individual’s equal rights under Pennsylvania law because of race or ethnicity.

Generally, inclusion of this amendment within the Pennsylvania Constitution signifies that freedom from discrimination based on race or ethnicity is an essential principle of liberty and free government. This amendment applies to all Pennsylvania state, county and local governmental entities, and guarantees equality of rights under the law. The amendment, if enacted, will become a part of the Pennsylvania Constitution. As such, its provisions must be applied consistent with the other provisions of the Constitution.

This equal right to be free from racial or ethnic discrimination will exist independent from any such rights under the United States Constitution or corresponding federal law. If the current federal protections proscribing racial or ethnic discrimination are abolished, the prohibition against such discrimination will remain in the Pennsylvania Constitution. The amendment is limited in that it creates a right only under Pennsylvania law.

Once added to the Pennsylvania Constitution, the right to be free from racial or ethnic discrimination under the law cannot be eliminated except by a judicial decision finding the amendment unconstitutional or the approval of a subsequent constitutional amendment. If approved, the General Assembly may pass new laws to implement the amendment, but it may not pass a law inconsistent with it.