Newsflash

     
Armstrong UCC Building Permit Activity Review PDF Print E-mail
Written by Mike Ceschini   
Tuesday, 30 January 2018 14:41

ARMSTRONG UCC BUILDING PERMIT ACTIVITY REVIEW

Residential construction, including the building of manufactured homes, rose by one percent in 2017 from the previous year among participating municipalities within the Armstrong Uniform Construction Code (UCC) Group.

That is according to a report reviewed by UCC Group representatives during their January meeting in Kittanning.

The Armstrong UCC Group formed in 2004, several years after The Pennsylvania Uniform Construction Code (UCC), Act 45 of 1999, became law. The purpose of UCC is to provide uniform standards for new construction and renovations. More than 90 percent of Pennsylvania's 2,562 municipalities have elected to administer and enforce the UCC locally using their own employees or via certified third party agencies (private code enforcement agencies) that they have retained.

Of the 45 municipalities in Armstrong County, 34 have elected to jointly administer the UCC through participation in the Armstrong County UCC Group.  The Group currently contracts with Bureau Veritas to provide third party inspection services for a set fee schedule.

Robert Conklin, Armstrong UCC Group vice-chairman and Kittanning Township supervisor, says municipalities belonging to the UCC Group have the advantage of obtaining a better rate when dealing with code enforcement agencies.

“Being part of a bigger group gives you more power when it comes to the bargaining table,” says Conklin. And, he adds, that since all municipalities are required to have an appeals board, being part of the UCC Group provides a larger pool from which to select appeals board members.

According to the Armstrong UCC 2017 report, last year saw a 13.9 percent increase from the previous year in overall permits issued among the Group’s participating municipalities – with Manor and East Franklin townships issuing the most permits. In addition to new residential construction and manufactured homes, permits were issued under categories that include new commercial construction, additions, renovations, demolitions, and others such as utilities, signs, pools and decks.

Although permit application numbers were up, Bureau Veritas Unit Manager Grant Kanish says 2017 wasn’t a big year for new commercial construction. However, some of the commercial projects of note included the construction of a grandstand at the Armstrong Junior-Senior High School in Manor Township and the construction of a new Dollar General store in Elderton Borough.

Kanish also has noted that there has been an increase in value of new homes being built over the last few years attributed to the construction of larger wood-framed or stick-built homes.

When it comes to the permit process, Kanish suggests that business owners and residents who are planning to build, demolish, or alter a structure should first contact their borough or township to see if there are zoning or sewage requirements.

“It all starts with the municipality,” says Kanish.

 
Healthy Armstrong

Facebook

YouTube

Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission